Men & Mental Health

Mental health challenges can affect anyone. However, men may feel pressure to conform to outdated cultural expectations. See how to find resources that can help.

6 million men suffer from depression every year. However, men are significantly less likely than women to seek treatment for mental health challenges.

6 million men suffer from depression every year. However, men are significantly less likely than women to seek treatment for mental health challenges.

Men may be more likely to cope with mental health challenges in harmful ways, like excessive drinking or substance use.

Men may be more likely to cope with mental health challenges in harmful ways, like excessive drinking or substance use.

Men may be diagnosed with depression less often because of a tendency to deny illness, self-monitor symptoms, and self-treat.

Men may be diagnosed with depression less often because of a tendency to deny illness, self-monitor symptoms, and self-treat.

Men are more likely to die by suicide, often due to untreated depression.

Men are more likely to die by suicide, often due to untreated depression.

Gender Stereotypes and Mental Health

Because of social expectations and gender stereotypes, men often face unique barriers in recognizing and addressing mental health challenges and having their feelings taken seriously. Men may brush off emotions, like sadness or hopelessness, as “stress,” which can lead to misdiagnosis.

Old-fashioned ideas of masculinity can also prevent men from getting adequate care. Men may feel pressure to “toughen up” when it comes to coping with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Ideas about masculinity can also affect LGBTQ+ men, especially transgender men, who may face discrimination and violence. Gender expectations can also hide challenges in men that are often seen as feminine, such as postpartum disorder, eating disorders, and body dysmorphia.

Ending the stigma around men expressing their feelings can help more men be open about their mental health challenges and help them get the support they need.

Learn More About Mental Health

Resources That Help

From support, to urgent needs, to frequent care, It’s Up to Us has a range of resources specifically designed to treat men’s mental health challenges.

Use Our Resource Tool
The Access and Crisis Line at (888) 724-7240 provides support 24/7. Experienced counselors can answer questions about mental health and substance use, provide referrals, offer support and crisis intervention. In the case of a medical emergency, call 911 or go to the nearest emergency room.
Suicide Prevention, Substances,
& Substance Use Disorders
There are many factors that can affect mental health. Get in-depth information and tips when it comes to suicide prevention, substances, and substance use disorders.
11 National Institute of Mental Health, https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/statistics/mental-illness#part_154790, Retrieved July 2021
12 Addis, Michael E et al, Men, Masculinity, and the Contexts of Help Seeking, PMID: 12674814 DOI: 10.1037/0003-066x.58.1.5
13 Paulson, James F., PhD; Bazemore, Sharnail D. MS, Prenatal and Postpartum Depression in Fathers and Its Association With Maternal Depression, A Meta-analysis, May 19, 2010, JAMA. 2010;303(19):1961-1969. doi:10.1001/jama.2010.605